Can one take more than one month for reading the Qur’an with contemplation?: Sheikh bin Baaz

Sheikh ‘Abd al-‘Aziz ibn ‘Abdillah bin Baaz, the former mufti of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, was once asked the following question:

سؤال :  كم يوماً يحتاج الإنسان إلى ختم القرآن بالفهم والتدبر، وهل إذا ختم الإنسان القرآن في شهرين يكون قد تأخر في قراءته؟ ـ

Question: How many days does a person need to complete reading the Qur’an if he is reading it with contemplation and understanding? And if a person completes the Qur’an over the course of two months, has he been slow in his reciting?

جواب :  النبي -صلى الله عليه وسلم- قال لعبد الله بن عمرو: (اقرؤه في شهر)، فلم يزل زدني يا رسول الله حتى قال: (اقرؤه في أسبوع)، ثم طلب الزيادة إلى ثلاث، وكان الصحابة يقرؤنه في الأسبوع، فالأفضل في الأسبوع، وإذا تيسر الثلاثة الأيام فلا بأس، لكن مع العناية بالتدبر، والتعقل والخشوع وإذا قرأ الإنسان القرآن في شهر أو شهرين فلا حرج لكن مع التدبر وإذا رتب القراءة كل شهر يقرأ كل يوم جزءاً، فهذا حسن كما قال النبي لعبد الله بن عمرو: (اقرأه كل شهر)، فإن الحسنة بعشر أمثالها، فالمقصود أن الإنسان يتحرى في قراءته الخشوع، والتدبر، والتعقل، والاستفادة سواء قرأه في شهر، أو شهرين، أو أقل، أو أكثر، لكن يكره أن يكون أقل من ثلاث، أقل شيء ثلاثة أيام، يقرأ في ثلاثة أيام ولياليها في كل يوم وليلة عشرة أجزاء هذا أقل ما ورد. ـ

Response: The Prophet (ﷺ) said to ‘Abdullah ibn ‘Amr, “Read it in one month”, but then ‘Abdullah ibn ‘Amr continued saying “I can read more, O Messenger of Allah”, until the Prophet said, “Read it in one week,” but then ‘Abdullah ibn ‘Amr sought to increase it to three days. And the Sahabah used to read the Qur’an once a week, and what is best is to recite it once a week, but then if it is easy for you to do that in three days, that is no problem. However this should be done with care given to contemplating the Qur’an, engaging with it, and having khushoo’.

And if a person recites the Qur’an once a month or once in two months, then this is not a problem, however it should be done with contemplation. So if he sets his reading schedule to complete the Qur’an once a month so that every day he reads one juz’ [one thirtieth], then this is good, just as the Prophet said to ‘Abdullah ibn ‘Amr, “Read it in one month”. For one good deed results in the reward of ten. And the goal is that a person aims to have khushoo’, contemplation, engagement, and getting something out of his reading of the Qur’an regardless of whether he completes it once a month or once every two months, or less than that or more than that. However, it is disliked to complete it in less than three days. The least amount of time is three days, for him to read it over the course of three days and nights, each day and night reading one tenth of the Qur’an. This is the smallest amount of time mentioned in the texts.

[Taken from the sheikh’s website here.]

See also: Which is more virtuous: reading a small amount of the Qur’an with tarteel and contemplation, or a large amount quickly? – Ibn al-Qayyim

See also: Naseehah to the Qur’an: Sheikh Saalih al-Fawzan

See also: What is the minimum amount of time to complete reciting the Qur’an: Sheikh bin Baaz

See also: How the Sahabah Used to Divide the Qur’an: Tafsir ibn Kathir

See also: How the Sahabah Read and Divided the Qur’an: ibn Taymiyah

See also: The Different Frequencies of Completing the Qur’an

12 thoughts on “Can one take more than one month for reading the Qur’an with contemplation?: Sheikh bin Baaz

  1. Pingback: Which is more virtuous: reading a small amount of the Qur’an with tarteel and contemplation, or a large amount quickly? – Ibn al-Qayyim | Tulayhah

  2. Salamualaikum Hey there Tulayhah. JazakAllah khair for the post and the translation I wanted to ask something of a Hadith. Its in Bukhari 1142 about”the three knots”. I really wanted to know the last part of the Hadith in English translation it says “mischievous heart” even though in other narration in Bukhari says “otherwise he gets up in low spirits and lethargic”.

    • wa ‘alaikum as salaam wa rahmatullaahi wa barakaatuh,

      Wa iyyaak, alhamdulillaah I am glad if the translation was of benefit.

      As far as I could tell, it is the translations that differ, not the wordings of the narrations themselves. The wording in both narrations in al-Bukhari is:

      [وَإِلاَّ أَصْبَحَ خَبِيثَ النَّفْسِ]

      And in his famous explanation of Saheeh al-Bukhari, Fath al-Baari, ibn Hajr al-‘Asqalaani explained this phrase by writing:

      [قوله : ( وإلا أصبح خبيث النفس ) ؛ أي بتركه ما كان اعتاده أو أراده من فعل الخير ]

      “The Messenger’s statement, ‘but otherwise he wakes up khabeeth al-nafs‘ – meaning: leaving off some of the good deeds which he would normally do or would like to do.” [Fath al-Baari #1091]

      And this is a close meaning to the next description of such a person in the hadeeth: [كَسْلاَنَ ] “lethargic”, and Allah knows best.

      I would just like to add that these two different translations of the same original wording highlight a problem with relying on translations of our religious sources without any accompanying scholarly explanation. It is imperative for us to return back to the guiding scholars who can explain the source texts (the Qur’an and Sunnah) to us according to how the early generations understood and practiced them. Otherwise, we are quite likely to come to erroneous conclusions if left to our own understandings, especially if we are already relying on someone else’s translations of the sources texts. This is one important reason why this site has been dedicated to presenting English translations of sound scholarly explanations of the source texts of our religion, especially regarding the Qur’an.

      BaarakAllaahu feek – Khalil Klopfenstein

  3. Pingback: What is the minimum amount of time to complete reciting the Qur’an: Sheikh bin Baaz | Tulayhah

  4. Pingback: How the Sahabah Used to Divide the Qur’an: Tafsir ibn Kathir | Tulayhah

  5. Pingback: The Great Merits of Reciting the Qur’an with Contemplation: ibn al-Qayyim | Tulayhah

  6. Pingback: The Great Merits of Reciting the Qur’an with Contemplation: ibn al-Qayyim – manhajkitab

  7. Pingback: More Advice for Memorizing the Qur’an: Sheikh ibn ‘Uthaymeen | Tulayhah

  8. Pingback: How to Contemplate the Qur’an: Sheikh Muhammad Bazmool | Tulayhah

  9. Pingback: How the Sahabah Read and Divided the Qur’an: ibn Taymiyah | Tulayhah

  10. Pingback: The Different Frequencies of Completing the Qur’an | Tulayhah

  11. Pingback: Completing the Qur’an in Three Months for One who is Ill: Sheikh ‘Abd al-Kareem al-Khudayr | Tulayhah

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